Posts tagged "Advance health care directives"

What is an advance healthcare directive?

An advance healthcare directive is an important part of an overall estate plan. It serves an important purpose estate planners should be aware of and they should also ensure all of their questions about an advance healthcare directive, and including one in their estate plan, are answered.

The value of having an advance health care directive

Planning for end-of-life is important to consider and can provide valuable peace of mind for the estate planner and their loved ones and family. Drafting an advance health care directive that reflects the wishes of the estate planner is useful, and understanding what an advance health care directive can do is beneficial.

Advance health care directives recognized in New York

As many of our readers know, advance health care directives are legal documents meant to ensure that a person's wishes are fulfilled even when they are unable to make an independent decision due to advanced age or poor health. Three types of advance heath care directives are recognized in New York State: the New York State Health Care Proxy; a living will; and a Do Not Resuscitate Order.

Discussing power of attorney information important for care

When making important decisions that involve other people, it is often wise to discuss the situation with the other parties involved. For example, if a New York resident wants to appoint a loved one or other trusted party to make medical decisions for him or her in the event of incapacitation, it is important to talk about those wishes. In some cases, the person given power of attorney may need to broach the topic.

A serious health condition may present a need for a living will

When New York residents think about planning for the future, many of them consider trips they would like to take, having a family, reaching career goals or other similar positive events. However, it is also important to plan for the not-so-positive life events. In particular, it is wise to plan for a potentially serious health condition.

Living will is an important care-related document

Estate planning can help New York residents determine how they want their assets distributed after death, and it can also help them plan for care that may be needed while still alive. Various documents can help with care planning, but it can be confusing to know which documents may be needed. In particular, parties may wonder about the difference between a living will and a health care proxy.

Young adults in New York may want to consider estate planning

Many young people often have the notion that they can take risks and nothing seriously wrong will befall them. Of course, a serious accident could affect anyone of any age, and because of this potential, estate planning can be useful to any adult, even young ones. Those New York residents heading off to college or away from home for the first time may not have anticipated creating such a plan, but it may be wise.

A living will does not have any right or wrong answers

It can be unsettling for many people to think about the possibility of suffering from a serious medical condition. However, it is a scenario that many people in New York and across the country face. Rather than avoiding the possibility and letting a situation become chaotic, it may be wise for individuals to consider creating a living will.

Estate planning documents relating to health care often vital

Medical attention is often necessary in various situations when a person's health is in question. As individuals age, they may become more aware of the fact that they could one day need extended care due to incapacitation or in the event of a possibly terminal condition. When these situations arises, New York residents will undoubtedly want to have the right estate planning documents in place.

Living wills can allow New York residents to express wishes

Many people will need some type of medical care near the end of their lives. In these cases, family members may feel at a loss as to what types of treatment should be tried or other actions taken in the event that a loved one cannot communicate his or her wishes in a potentially terminal situation. In hopes of avoiding this type of situation, New York residents may want to consider creating living wills.

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